Two Forces of Globalization
Two Hashtags

The End of Work

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"The use of horse labor used to grow along with the population and the economy. In the United States horse labor grew 6 fold from 1840 to 1900. But then it plummeted as internal combustion engines replaced horses on farms, in factories, for transportation. Does the same fate await humans, or at least some humans?"

 
See http://www.futurepundit.com/archives/009918.html.
 
In ten years, what do you think these young women in Glasgow will be doing to earn a living?
 
The Bureau of Labor Statistics link in the above blog post shows that the work for people will available to those who are more intellectually developed and capable of handling more complex, adaptation oriented work.
 
These stats show that our society and the economy that under girds it is changing dramatically. The push to automate the functions of business is a continued recognition that people are simply components in a system. While the age of production passed a generation ago, the age of information is built upon the same foundation that people are expensive and superfluous in a global economy. This is not just a capitalist development, but also the same outcome that comes from governments that seek to integrate all aspects of society under their control.
 
It is time to admit that the large institutions of business and government, those that I refer to as the forces of global integration, are not going to be the source of new jobs in the future. We need, you and me, to begin to establish a parallel economy based in individual human initiative that does two things.
 
One is to build networks of relationships that provide a communal platform for economic enterprise that supports families and strengthens local communities.
 
Second, we need to establish a culture of initiative where the creative endeavors of individuals becomes the core purpose of an educational system that is preparing people for the realities found in these statistics. This means we must shift the mission of educational institutions away from preparing students to work in systems of production, to being able to create their own businesses and networks of relationships.
 
I’m convinced that every child should have been provided experience in creating a business that monetizes some idea that they have by the time they enter middle school. Repeated attempts to start projects and new businesses at a young age will foster a culture of collaborative independence that is the parallel economy that we need along side a global economy of integration.
 
Let me then ask you the following questions as a way to move you into action.
 
If you had to do one thing in the next year that would make a difference in your local community, what would that be?
 
Is it important enough that you would give up some aspect of your life to do it?
 
Is it the sort of thing that you could find a way to monetize it if you found yourself on January 1 out of the job you currently have?
 
Living with this perspective in mind is how we'll adapt to a world where the global forces of integration have no place for human beings to contribute.
 
Read the whole article linked above, and especially connect to the links of the jobs that are growing and declining.
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